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books every weekend on c-span2. from the fourth annual book festival, the triumph of the city featuring edward glaeser. his book is "the triumph of the city: how our greatest invention makes us richer, smarter, greener, healthier and happier." >> thank you for coming to the auditorium today. this is brought to you by wbur new station. thank you. thank you. i am sure some of you are saying, wow, that is bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller. i thought he was thinner. i thought he had more hair. [laughter] you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and think the book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific event? [applause] >> that is also part of the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this session and without their generosity, it would be hard to put on an event like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoyed in this great city. so thank you to them. [applause] in the way, that is what we are here to talk about this afternoon. the triumph of the cit
of the city, featuring edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wb, ur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? this. [laughter] i thought he was taller, i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair, and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a atlantic event? -- a terrific event? [applause] let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city, so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the cit
. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from invading much longer. its allies did not want a ground war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have help
to bad investments by local governments. nhk world a mad ahas the story. >> reporter: the city of ordos rises above the autonomous region. the bulk of the revenue earned in the city came from making cashmere, but the coal mines started operating and making a lot of money. in 2004 city officials began increasing the population of an area to 1 million. since then, they have spent nearly $800 million new condominiums and other buildings. now the area has a lot of high rise buildings including a theater and government offices. not many residents, only about 70,000 people live here. >> all over the city homes but no occupants. >> with so many empty homes and so few people to buy them, and in many other parts of china similar projects also fizzled. there they have left the local government with mountains of debt. after the global financial crisis in 2008 central government authorities encouraged local municipalities including ordos to spur the economy. the central officials pushed them to invest more. so the local governments borrowed huge amounts of money. the funds went into real estate but
in redwood city are moving out tonight and some are staying to fight to convert night a complex. it's called peace harbor. abc 7 news has the story. >> they were leaving with all belongings, this after living here aboard the boat. >> it's wonderful and we've enjoyed it. >> most people living on the boats have left. yellow tapes mark empty berths. only 36 of the 88 tenants are still here, all given notices that they would have to move by mid$e7& january. pete's widow wants to sell to a developer planning to build a 411 unit apartment ask condo complex. the family attorney says all leases were month to month, noting waits for sale, saying this was pete's vision a hasher built five decades ago it will bring $2.4 hillin of appropriate tax into the city. creating 2000 jobs in the community. >> a group is fighting the development. buckly and wendy stone live add board their cruiser 20 years. they don't know where they're going. >> i'm on a fixed income. i can't afford to put a first and last down someplace. >> buckly has no hard feelings against her saying she helped him when he had cancer and wo
.c. penney opened just minutes ago. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington is live at the retailer in daly city. elissa, tell us about this new marketing strategy. >> reporter: j.c. penney wasn't even supposed to open until 6:00 this morning but opened an hour early at 5:00. you can see shoppers inside. some of the competitors opened as early as yesterday to offer deal seekers door buster sales. j.c. penney has a different business model. they are all about low prices every day. the new ceo ron johnson eliminated sales and coupon deals to try to change the way america shops. sales dropped by 26%. the company also posted a $123 million loss last quarter. still, they are sticking to their guns. they are, however, having this black friday sale. they are calling their only sale weekend of the year but they didn't want to overlap into thanksgiving. they decided they were not going to open until today. usually they open at 4 a.m. on black friday. they opened an hour later. i spoke with some shoppers waiting for the doors to open. >> it's a little late an everyone is probably really tired and they won
at the shark tank. >> the hockey strike, the downtown needs to be able to bring people in. >> the city councilman said the loss of hockey fans has hurt local bars and trounce big time. >> you don't know what you have until you have don't have it. that's what's happening. >> he misses all those hungry shark fans and hopes this festival will be a gift. >> without this it will be a really sad holiday. >> having been a long time san jose sharks fans since i was a kid. >> he helped open the brew pub weeks after the holidays agains. crist believes it is an amazing opportunity. >> families can enjoy opportunities to go and hopefully it will help the economy downtown. >> on friday we learned natural cancelled all hockey games through mid-december. many are optimistic the sharks will take to the ice before the end of the year. in san jose, colonel bernard. >> y7 news. >> 25,000 people, twice as many as last year, crowded into san francisco's union square for last night's annual tree lighting ceremony. >>> three, two, one! it was the 23rd straight year for the macy's sponsored tree lighting. 33,
no hockey at the shark tanks. >> the downtown needs to be able to bring people in. >> san jose city councilmen man says the loss has hurt local bars and restaurants big time. he misses all those hungry shark fans and hopes the festival will be a gift. >> without this it would be really sad holiday. >> i've been a long time sharks fan. >> bob helped open it after the weeks after the walkout begin. olympic skating scar believes that holiday spirit is needed. >> and now it's amazing for families to enjoy the holidays and enjoy activities together. hopefully it will help the economy here in downtown. >> on friday we learned the nhl cancelled all hockey games through mid-december. many are optimistic the sharks will take to the ice before the end of the year. >> terry: 25,000 people, twice as many as last year crowded into san francisco's union square for the annual tree lighting ceremony. it was a 23rd straight year for the macy's sponsored tree lighting. how many lights? 33,000. how many ornaments 1100. it's 38 feet and it is spectacular and twice as many people as last year. it sounds
will deal with that city by city and we will have success. secondly, the utility's charge various fees to set up and provide the electricity. we want to make sure that it is cost recovery and to not be unreasonable. we meet with them if their problem and we react. through the public utilities commission, through local regulation, we react and try to do everything we can to solve problems. if you are talking about deals like if you come to california, we will pay 7000 for any job, we have a little bit of that but it is hard to pay people for their business activities. we do not have enough money. they're doing that all over the state. cutting deals. we are doing that in some respects. it is our race. how does michigan spent so much subsidy attracting -- michigan is not doing that well. you have some money but what about other things to invest in and take care of? we want to make our regulatory climate more transparent. we have a long way to go. we are open and ready to go. there is a lot of people who want to keep the regulation complicated or make it worse. it is -- this could be somet
will find are engaged, informed, cultured citizens and in growing numbers. we are a smarter city than we give ourselves credit for, and we need to get comfortable with that idea. i hope it's because you've been watching more public television, i hope so. [applause] [laughter] but i am sure that there is no better way to take us to the next level than to hear from a literary icon. tom wolfe was born and raised in richmond, virginia, educated at washington university and later learned a ph.d. from yale. he spent his first ten years as a newspaper man mostly doing general assignment reporting, and i bet if i called on many of you, you could easily name his novels; "the right stuff," "in our time," "the bonfire of the vanities" and many more, and now "back to blood" which reflects miami back to all of us. how are we going to react to that? he is credited with the birth of new journalism and the death of the american novel by some. he is the mark twain of our time. how lucky are we to have a moment in time with him? and what better way to start this conversation -- hopefully i can get them to
that heralds the start of a new campaign. the bomb had been left under a seat. and predictably on a city center bus, there were many passengers. they became the many injured. the bus bombing came as they were cleaning up after a missile strike in a suburb of tel aviv. an air raid siren had saved the lives of the elderly couple who call this apartment home. bus bombings by compairosn are so terrifying because they come with no warning. this was the first such attack of its kind. this time round, only a ceasefire would give it any chance of being the last. >> woodruff: residents of gaza endured another barrage of air assaults today before the ceasefire was called. john ray of independent television news was on the ground in the territory today. >> reporter: after a week of air strikes, gaza has been pummeled by the most intense barrage yet. under the plumes of smoke and fire, there's a sports stadium israel claims is used to train terrorists. news of that terrorist attack in tel aviv was proclaimed from the minnerettes. sweets were handed out but the celebration soon gave way to worry about israe
town. you can do it every day, of course. something very important to new york city mayor michael bloomberg, who will join us to talk about it in our next half hour. >>> then an unusual punishment for a convicted killer in oklahoma. a teenager was sentenced to spend ten years in church after pleading guilty to manslaughter. the ruling has sparked a legal dispute and we'll hear from both sides in that case. >>> a bit later, we'll switch gears with a look at tonight's power ball jackpot drawing. there are 325 million reasons or so to buy a ticket. it is one of the biggest jackpots in history. did you buy one? will you buy one? >> i am going to play and then i am going to pray. >> i like that strategy. i like it. >> we'll see if it works this time. >>> we do want to begin with the death of actor larry hagman. msnbc's thomas roberts is here with a lot more on that. good morning. >> he truly was a one of a kind. larry hagman will forever be remembered for iconic role as j.r. ewing on the primetime drama "dallas." the character was a scheming business cheat, an unfaithful husband, and a
cloud free skies now. it's been another mild day. readings in mid to upper 60s. 68 in redwood city. 66 on the coast. and this is our first forecast. turn cooler in fact will be chilly with sunny skies we'll see patchy of fog in valleys low temperatures into upper 30s in north bay valleys overnight, tomorrow afternoon, mild again, milder than today as a matter of fact. highs from mid to upper of 0s on the coast to low 70s around the bay and inland. i'll have the accu-weather forecast coming up. >> thank you so much, spencer, still ahead at 4:00 black friday deals weren't the only thing that had people standing in line today. why it was a good day for giants fans.. >> battle for holiday dollars. how a new tax on internet purchases changed a playing field. >> cutting the cord when it comes to music, taking a look at wireless speakers and impact on audio quality. >> looking at the skyway, head together east bay, left to right, just fine. better than you'd expect on a weekday. it's a holiday for many people. but congested on the ride side of the screen stay with us, abc news at 4:00 continu
one of the big things you have is maas i have cities being developed where you have huge needs like the kind of infrastructure feeds we talk about, and the idea that cities are going to be walking around with these mobile computers that are far more powerful than anybody's computer was 20 years ago, it's going to be a tremendous opportunity for these cities solve problems. just like john snowe and henry white had walking around london in 1854, they were looking for patterns in the day. but they didn't have real technology that let them notice those patterns or report them. now in these new emerging, you know, mega cities, we're going to have tremendous resources available. >> host: and we'll finish with a quote from the both map. with the exception of the earth atmosphere, the city is life's largest footprint and microbes are its smallest. it is a great testimony to the connectedness of life on earth that the fates of the largest and the tiniest life should be so closely dependent on each other. and for the past three hours we have been talking with steven onson, to have of -- johns
of greek cities as people that just the bad news from brussels -- as people digested the bad news from brussels. >> i do not know if i to make a difference to our everyday lives. the measures that have been taken thus far have already left us in poverty. all i had to say is that the people are very disappointed. >> the government says it has done all it can to comply with the demands of international creditors, and the eurozone countries and imf must keep their part of the bargain. with state bankruptcy looming, athens has issued treasury bills with shorter maturity as a way of raising cash quickly. the opposition in greece blame the prime minister but added that germany and in particular chancellor merkel were also at fault. >> mr. samaras has become an inseparable part of ms. merkel's election campaign. she cannot admit to the german people in the run-up to elections that she made a mistake, that she is responsible for the coming recession and that the greek debts must be cut. >> the german finance minister continues to reject that option. he says he was confident that an agreement w
. >>> our other major news right now is a terror attack in tel aviv. an explosion on a city bus is injuring multiple people. someone placed a bomb on a bus and then fled. this attack comes as an urgent diplomatic effort is still under way for a truce between israel and hamas. secretary of state clinton is there. and for details on their visit, we're joined by abc's lama hasan. >> reporter: good morning, rob. well, yes. we were expecting some kind of cease-fire deal to be announced. some kind of cease-fire plan to be announced late last night. but that did not happen. it did not come. and according to some hamas and egyptian officials, who have reportedly said that it was down to israel, who had requested more time. and they said that more talks would resume today. now, as you rightly said, the u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, she is in the region. she was meeting with the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, late last night. and standing shoulder-to-shoulder, she reiterated the u.s.'s unwavering support for israel to protect its citizens, for the citizens here to live in pea
cities and towns must end. >> reporter: secretary clinton met with palestinian leader mahmoud abbas this morning and will lead are egyptian president mohamed morsi later today. >> the goal is to promote regional stability and advance the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace deal. his muslim brotherhood is hamas' parent organization but egypt also has close ties to america and relies heavily on u.s. aid. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> and some journalists have been incredibly close to the action. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel room this morning as israeli military launched dozens of air strikes. he tweeted huge explosions in gaza, blew out the window of my room. we're all okay. it's getting very close. >>> the man who shot and killed two people at the richmond bridge found he wants the jury wants him to die. nathan burris murdered his girlfriend and her friend on the toll plaza. yesterday he turned to them in court, and y
, the downtown needs to be able to bring people in. >> the city councilman said the loss of hockey fans has hurt big time. >> you don't know what you have until you have don't have it. that's what's happening. >> he misses all those hungry shark fans and hopes this festival will be a gift. >> without this it will be a really sad holiday. >> having been a long time san jose sharks fans since i was a kid. >> he helped open the brew pub began. christieiam gucci said the holiday spirit is kneaded right a way. it's an amazing opportunity for families to come and enjoy the holidays and enjoy opportunities together. hopefully it will help the economy in downtown. >> on friday we learned the nhl cancelled all hockey games through mid-december. still many are optimistic the sharks will take to the ice before the end of the year. in san jose, abc7 news. >> 25,000 people, twice as many as last year, crowded into san francisco's union square for last night's annual tree lighting ceremony. >>> three, two, one! it was the 23rd straight year for the macy's sponsored tree lighting. 33,000 lights. 1100 ornaments
of the city's most violent crime spree. he was killed outside a 7-eleven in an attempted carjacking. services will be held at the darling fisher memorial chapel in campbell tomorrow morning at 10:00. >>> a pilot has died after crashing his small plane in calaveras county. it went down a mile south of the calaveras county airport. this is the scene near the crash near san andre yeses. the plane is described as an experimental aircraft. the pilot was the only one on board, and his identity has not been released. still no word on what caused the accident. >>> 80s icon larry hagman has died. he is probably best known as the oil baron jr ewing on "dallas." he recently revised his role on a reboot for cable. according to a newspaper linda gray and patrick duffy were at his bedside when he passed away late this afternoon. he died of cancer and was 81 years old. >>> an explosion that rocked springfield, massachusetts was caught on camera. look at this video. the blast leveled a bar and damaged 12 buildings nearby. it was fueled by a gas leak. nobody died, but 18 people suffered nonlife-threatening in
for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. >> eliot: in a bipolar war nuclear arms strategy was he said to under and the doctrine of destruction led to a period of stability. as we end to a multi poller world, we head to a dangerous era. author of the new book" the second nuclear age: strategy, danger and the new power of politics." professor, thank you for joining us. >> good to be here. >> eliot: this is a grim forecast that you are giving to us. first explain why we have had stability and why that will change? >> well, the second nuclear age is the spread of nuclear weapons that had nothing to do with the cold war. one of the sources of stability back then w
could dold d before. john: maybe they'll invent the i new cars on cities built onlt water free the tent calls of neb government -- tentacles from government. ideas have sex. wait, what? yes, this writer explains. >> ideas spread, and when they t meet, they can mate.t jon john and because of that, we live in a wonderful world.n that's a our show constant tonight. ♪ >> and now, john stossel. ♪ and i think to, what a wonderful world ♪ john: what a wonderful world? what are they talking about? all i hear from the media is doom; unemployment, pollution, social conflict. all those things exist, but it'b good that every once in a whilee someone puts it in perspective. this man did that, he's a swedish public health professoru now, on this show i don't likesh usually to put on swedish public health professors or danish public health professors for that matter. i think they put you to sleep. but hans roseling has caught the world's attention because he gave a tent talk, lectures given by techies, it sands for technology entertainment design. but roseling's talk has been viewed more than 10
. this is the scene right now in gaza city. it's remarkable. for the first time in days people are out in the streets. they are celebrating. traffic is bumper-to-bumper. everyone, everyone appears to be in celebration. people waving flags and firing guns in the air. while our crews saw outgoing rockets and heard explosions in the hours leading up to the cease-fire deadline, they've seen little or no military activity since then only the celebrating. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into
coming aboard. he has been a big edition addition to the rockets. leaving oklahoma city. 131, 103 the final with 13 points. the knicks oldest team in the nba the rockets, the youngest, go figure. old people can't compete with the young kids. the league has now cancelled all regular season games through december 14 as well as all-star weekend in columbus. boy that hurts their economy. commissioner gary bettman said wednesday the lockout is costing the league between 18 and $20 million per day. the players union and league remain far apart on a potential deal. that is not helping on this small business saturday. for the fourth straight year, underarmor decking out two college teams in patriotic jerseys all part of their underarmor campaign supporting the wounded warrior project. clayton has a jersey. this is worn by the university of hawaii today. they are taking on unlv. it's been a tough year for hawaii. now they are going to really do something good. helping underarmor. the jerseys will be auctioned off. clayton showed you the jersey says freedom instead of the names of the playe
at queens center mall here in new york city. we also have liz dunn of mcquarry capital on the west coast in san francisco. great to have you all with us. laura, why don't i get to you first of all. what are you seeing out there on the floor of the malls? >> so traffic's slowing a little bit which is normal for the afternoon. i think that most of the traffic -- most of the big buys were for electronics and toys. those happened last night. they may be happening online more and more. but the mall's bit slow, we think, relative to a year ago. >> do you think people came in earlier with all of these earlier openings that we've been hearing about? do you feel maybe that's just drifted off a little bit as everyone's now done their shopping and gone loam to bed? >> i'm pretty sure that that is what has happened here. you don't normally see -- this is an urban mall in queens. i would not judge the rest of the country by this particular mall. most of the estimates were about 2.5% growth on top of 4% last year. that looks reasonable to us and it is pretty consistent with what we're hearing in other
was the innocent victim of one of the city's most violent crime spree. he was killed outside a 7-eleven in an attempted carjacking. services will be held at the darling fisher memorial chapel in campbell tomorrow morning at 10:00. >>> a pilot has died after crashing his small plane in calaveras county. it went down a mile south of the calaveras county airport. this is the scene near the crash near san andre yeses. the plane is described as an experimental aircraft. the pilot was the only one on board, and his identity has not been released. still no word on what caused the accident. >>> 80s icon larry hagman has died. he is probably best known as the oil baron jr ewing on "dallas." he recently revised his role on a reboot for cable. according to a newspaper linda gray and patrick duffy were at his bedside when he passed away late this afternoon. he died of cancer and was 81 years old. >>> an explosion that rocked springfield, massachusetts was caught on camera. look at this video. the blast leveled a bar and damaged 12 buildings nearby. it was fueled by a gas leak. nobody died, but 18 p
different steel mills, for about engraft immediately on the fifth one put out a plan to kansas city that the blame on being. >> ray. what jimmy carter's programs didn't work then. as i mentioned, i remember waiting in the 1970s to philip gasoline in the washington d.c. area. just as the programs didn't work then and are not working now, they're unlike to work in the future. it's just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government wouldn't have thought of picking apple iphone five for example. that is expensive, but people wait in line because they want to buy one. it's not necessarily technology and expensive. is it just know what people want spend money and we don't know what it is. but there's other smart entrepreneurs and i'm sure many in the audience who have a better idea than the folks in washington. >> would you be in favor of a significantly higher gasoline tax to address the hidden social cost of pollution, what economists refer to as externalities? >> if i thought the castling were underpriced coming if they would be in favor of a carbon tax, n
city. and there was a wonderful moment the night before the community opened when one of his lutenants was sitting around a table in arizona and he said how am i going to sell a 30 year mortgage to somebody who is 65-year-old. and they said we should have thought about that before. and they had sleepless nights and the next day 100,000 people came. and they managed to make what was seen as a necessity, a virtue. and this idea of the golden years became a hall mark of the american dream. it's not just retirement that was invented in the last century. even addlessens t idea of youth was concocted in the early part of the century. that word was coined by a 60-year-old. because we were at a situation in the country where there was a proliferation of the night nors of that day. i was talking earlier about night young nor old as the characteristic of so many of news our 50's, 60's, sevent. well there were these young people who weren't children or quite adults. there was a lot of disruption in the country. there was concern about these young people who had physician cal maturity but not emot
at visiting new countries. in early '56 they attended the moderation of the new resicilian president a city show called the most beautiful city she had ever seen and the party at the palace were fabulous. but she did find a client change quite a terrific adjustment. they went in january. there was a 75 degree climate change when they went in one day. in july of that year, the nixons set off on a another tour. she explained in a letter it was a fast and full trip. the course of one day, we were in three countries thailand, pakistan, and turkey. a lot her husband with government leaders she had her own schedule. in the end she wrote, it was a dizzy but happy that in such a short time so much could be accomplished. in november of 1958, the couple traveled to london where pat wowed much of the british press with the wardrobe and unspoiled manner. the following year they went to the soviet union and poll poll lane. -- poland -- argued the merit of communism and capitalism in an exhibition of american consumer goods. pat had her own agenda of visiting or fan inches and hospitals. she might have g
graduation. new york city mayor michael bloomberg calls it the single biggest problem facing the economy and argues that our current approach is national suicide. the good news is we may finally be on the road to a solution. immigration reform has been a taboo topic for the last few years as large and vocal voices within the republican party with considerable public support have blocked any mention of reform. the words they've wanted to hear are border fence and deportation. that's why mitt romney activated a policy of self-deportation during the prisonal campaign. that's why he lost the spanish vote and asian vote to president obama by a landslide. president obama seems emboldened and the republicans chasened. so we have an opening for a deal. what should it look like? >> well, it should look like e bipartisan bond. that one did not even get to the floor of the house or senate for a vote. the right hated it because it provided a legal path for undocumented workers. the left because it reduced family unification and the unions opposed the temporary worker provisions. in an earlier era,
in select cities this summer and the cost is around $25,000, but that's if you factor in after you factor in 7,500 worth of federal tax credits. remember, gm did not do really well at all with the chevy volt and that's the hybrid price much higher and unveiling the spark at california where they are required, all automakers are required to sell at the least some all electric cars. look at gm stock, no impact on that, below 25 now, you've got to hit 53 a share before our taxpayers get money back from the bailout. and united nations climate conference, the u.s. is told it's not doing enough to stop temperatures from chiming. china and india, and other major polluters want us to pay more. we're calling this a global money grab. they want us, they want more money from us. and here with the nrdc action fund. why are we the targets of-- why are we the villains here? >> well, stuart, i think that we're looking out for american interests here and this climate change is a threat to americans and we see that threat across the summer. the worst drought that i know. >> i've got the talking points, bu
the ability to service secondary cities.trainer we don't have the ability to service secondary cities.strain or we don't have the ability to service secondary cities. how can where can we achieve gr scale. and the board of directors are being very strong with us that we must meet key criteria. i don't intend to manage other airlines. >> access then is the key word here and it's also a way of circumventing some of the difficulties they've been facing and acquiring additional landing rates. but there's something broader at stake here and that is the fact that the whole industry. >> that traditional flows are changing. the goal of hubs as a transfer point, a range of activities, the consumer is saying the hubs are working better than the traditional asian or european hubs. at the end of the day, the consumer will determine who is successful, so we have to get the right product, the right aircraft, the right positioning. and quite frankly that's what i believe they have been doing. >> in terms of scale, still quite a long shot from emirates airlines. of course you can watch the whole inte
in the southern city of kochin represents the booming economy. and with growth projections here as high as 7% for the year, the expanding indian market for goal could push prices past $2500 an ounce. "buy it, keep it, buy 24-carat gold, put it in a locker, and when you need money, turn around and sell it and make good money on it." > > and come to umreth to do it. "yes, come to my shop!" reporting from india, paul eggers, first business news. the indian government tightly regulates the gold market by testing jewelery for quality. chokesee believes this is a positive, because it helps protect customers from low- quality pieces. an overwhelming number of parents in the u.s. believe their children are growing up without learning valuable life skills such as how to manage their money. as many as 7 out of 10 parents expect these lessons to be taught in public school. nathaniel and stacey didomenico's young daughter, arianna, is more ahead of the game than she realizes. "we've already started with our daughter. there are things she wants at the store and we explain that it costs money, we have to
was just in salt lake city and i took a walk downtown and i saw a pillar that had been built in the last 4 years that a big block of sandstone that i recognized. it was probably wingate sandstone that had been hauled up there from about 200, 250 miles away, but i noticed in the pillar that was a gap at the bottom and i walked up and looked through the gap and i saw there were some posts in the distance and i looked around and there was a circle around the gap and there were signs around it and then each post a prism in it so that light going through the crack would hit the prism and that light would go to another prism and you would be able to tell the time of year by this object that was built in the last 4 years. and i saw this and i thought, what would archeologists think if they encountered this? they would look at this and say, what civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not
him were in a mission to an nile late all competition with the ads to bomb the hell out of the city. newt gingrich was the biggest threat. here is a romney supporting ad destroying newt. >> you know what makes barack obama happy, newt gingrich's baggage? he has more baggage than the airlines. freddie mac helped cause the xlik collapse. gingrich paid in. they paid him $36,000 an hour, $1.6 million. he teamed up with nancy pelosi on global warning and together they co-sponsored a bill supporting china's brutal one-child policy. >> there has been a lot of discussion in my head about whether ads work in general elections. no ad is going to change their mind. >> in primaries, they are deadly, particularly in republican primaries. that ad in particular for newt gingrich was devastating. >> didn't you see the loving looks. >> real quick on that. i would have pivot off of that caption of him and nancy together. that's what the people are looking for, that partnership, working, getting things done. they were talking about global warning. >> the other thing about that ad, it was symbolic of t
at games with poverty and games of money. one of my favorite examples was a group out of new york city called the area code. if you are looking at lots of examples of creative solutions to problems, is one to look at. they did a game around money where communities in the south that have high rates of mortgage defaults, and low rates of savings, and they made up a currency called macon money. macon, georgia, so they had macon money. ads in dollar bills but all of them have been cut in half. they gave out all this money, but they were all half a dollar bill. the currency could be used in local stores in services like cash, but you had to find the other person with half of your bill, and they created a social gaming environment where you could meet up. if we met in a coffee shop we could use its air, and it created a social layer and physical community to transform the community and also bring positive of motions, that you have solved this problem and have success, and it is really interesting. basically, my answer is yes. there are so many crazy things you can thing to do with a game des
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
the world come and my point is this. whether you are in baltimore brazil, kansas city or cairo, that our young men and women with desire and potential to build a bright future, to work on business and social innovations that can unleash an new wave of opportunity and economic growth. for this generation, the internet is a primary platform for innovation, where their future is being invented. my experience has convinced me that we are at a crossroads. the threats are real. but nothing i've seen has shaken my optimism. working hard and working together, i'm convinced that we can turn back the threats and ensure that all people benefit from the amazing opportunities of the internet and that we can, as newt minow taught us, harness new communications technologies to help deliver a future of prosperity and peace. thank you. [applause] >> terrific. thank you very much, chairman genachowski. and also want to thank you on behalf of my company, ibm. you sustained a really constructive dialogue with my chairman and ceo, both new and old one, over the years in the administration. thank you very muc
the shops early next year. and the u.s. postal service plans to test same day package delivery in big cities. the service will initially be offered in san francisco. pricing hasn't been announced and the postal service working out agreements with 8 to 10 large retail chains. and the government will appeal a ruling over unpaid debts stemming from the country's default a decade ago. wednesday a federal judge in new york ordered argentina to pay in full everything it owes to several u.s. investment funds. the judge also barred the country from paying other bond holders until the bill is paid. still to come, u.s. retailers are turning on the lights and throwing open the doors to holiday shoppers even earlier this year. will the promise of big deals lead to big profitses? we'll be back at the mall. but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this coo
think the debate is somewhat margin all for the occurrences city. >> do you agree in terms of the marginal impact? >> i do understand where the argument comes from.frankly is of the currency. the problem is two fold. one, we haven't got a counter factual. we sort of have. look at ireland. but without that very dramatic counter factual, it looks like qe is not doing anything. i would argue it's successful at neutralizing the deflationary contraction. but it's hard to read. we have so many other countries doing qe or sending messages about whether they'll stop or accelerate or slow down or might do it that actually looking at currencies that are all relative, it's hard to read this. what we can see is that the dollar was under an stream amount of delusionary pressure during the qe experience with the exceptions where it spiked up during actual panic. the really interesting thing about the euro is the hur row hasn't fallen that much given the fact it's dominated the bad news. and that i would say is because they haven't done the dilution of qe yet. so it's held its own against
can we keep inculcating this? i think one thing is in the big city, i think it's easy to inculcate this in the city where you come across people who look different all the time. then i also talk about literature. when i was a kid i did not come across people who looks different all the time and i learned about religious minorities, african-americans and i learned from books. there was one particular author that i talk about, arcuri d. angeli who was a pennsylvania woman who wrote books about religious minorities and she particularly focused on minorities that had lives that seem constraining to the majority. one of my favorite looks when i was little was a book called meehan about a little quaker girl who wants the pink party dress is dresses that her classmates had and she really hates it that her mother is urging her to wear this grey gray and so on. then one day, it said in the period of the underground railway, the mother -- well, a woman comes who is a slave from the underground railway and she is looking for a place to hide and she spots this little girl by her quaker attire.
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